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and bar public funds from funding abortions. in california, voters defeated ballot measures to repeal the death penalty and another that would have required labeling of genetically modified foods. a separate measure to ease penalties for nonviolent offenses under california's three strikes law was approved. california voters rejected measure that would have curbed the political influence of unions. in montana, voters overwhelmingly approved a measure that would limit corporate spending on elections while colorado voters also resoundingly approved a measure @acking a constitutional amendment that would call for the same. in a historic vote, voters in colorado and washington state have legalized marijuana for recreational use, becoming the first u.s. states to do so and setting up a potential clash with the federal government. tuesday's elections are reports of widespread voting issues ranging from a voter machine malfunctions to up lines to a poll watcher challenges and confusion over voter id laws that have been weakened or blocked. florida voters waited up to seven hours to cast thei
@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
a record turn out in california. the secretary of state says many precincts reporting a high volume of voters. 18 million people registered to vote for the election. that is a state record. half of those plan to vote by mail.uu=÷ >> really interesting to see such a large turn out in polling places because i'm also suspecting that we're going to have largest vote by mail turn out in the history of the state. >> that is a big achievement considering only 31% of the eligible voters took part in the june primary. many voters dropped off ballot was out leaving their cars. san jose's most watched race is measure did. california schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
, but something tells me it's going to pass overwhelmingly. there's a series of issues, idaho, california and alabama have propositions that accounted limit collective bargaining, and then michigan has an initiative that would put collective bargaining rights into the constitution. how do you think this election could impact union rights? obviously this may be slowing from what we saw with scott walker in wisconsin. >> right i think california's posed to reject that initiative and should. workers have a storied history in california of standing up for working families and i think will remain able to be able to be politically active. in large part, the attacks of mitt romney on the american auto industry have fueled interest in that campaign and created excitement. bam become that's a right to work state. i haven't seen much from the campaign but assume the people supporting it, it goes something like jesus didn't like to organize. [ laughter ] >> you know, he had 13 apostles with him. >> you are too funny. carl, thank you so much for joining us inside the war room. i know you are excited
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
. >> got maryland locked up. >> bill: and california. got the big states. >> i'm taking -- >> bill: he hope we voted yes on measure 7 to allow gambling in maryland? >> i'm going to vote today. i'm taking my 7-year-old with me to go vote. he's never been so we're going to go. >> bill: let him punch the buttons. >> i think i might. [ laughter ] don't tell anybody though. >> bill: he can probably make as intelligent a decision as you could. >> he's better informed. >> bill: and you know, we're going to look forward here. we're looking forward. thinking positive. we're look forward to four more years of barack obama. we also have to look backward and chuckle at some of the highlights of this campaign. there have been -- think back. >> it has been insane. i was just thinking on my way in this morning -- >> bill: we were in south carolina. >> less than a year ago. so much has happened. >> bill: we remember some of the high points of this campaign. we'll bring them to you. newt gingrich, he was number one for some t
, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sweep all of the competitive races that we have in california in order to get even close to the 25. >> a couple of house races in which an incumbent is in danger, first in maryland. >> roscoe bartlett is a victim of democratic redistricting where he used to represent western maryland and now comes down to montgomery county and the washington, d.c. suburbs. he faces delaney, who is surprising. but the democratic nature -- the new democratic nature of the district will be tough for bartlett, even though ross perot has -- even though he has an element that the stomach of a typical republican. but he is facing a very differe
house and he lost california where he is building a car elevator. so i would say to know him ain't to love him. >> that says a lot. >> bill: and paul ryan lost wisconsin. i mean romney lost wisconsin but paul ryan didn't help. boy, if i got to tell you florida still up for grabs. >> bill: that's why we're there for you every day. >> caller: i appreciate it. i'm over here by west palm, we're already called, done, it's set. now we're just waiting for the minutiae to finally get through. >> bill: that's in large part to good people like you who made it happen. those people standing in those long lines in florida, i don't know that i could do that. rick scott, trying to tamp it down prevent people from vote, no, no no, we're going to stand in line. they did it. >> this was an interesting election because you could, you could do this last election, too, but more people are checking twitter if you're waiting in line, you have twitter, so there was a big movement saying stay in line. if the polls close at 8:00 and you're in line at 7:58, stay in line. >> bill: there was a place in virgi
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
it comes to nontransportation, you'll never guess. who wants to guess? california. who would have thought. >> i would have thought new york. >> exactly. because of subwaist. but this is nontransportation. -- because of subways. but this is nontransportation. 40% of our energy consumption is hvac. heating and cooling buildings, build they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons burry as governor moonbeam but he got it passed. so every building in california had energy standards and it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things -- i said portman and sheheen have been compromising. my view, katrina -- sorry -- sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or another. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry -- we have had 300 or -- sorry. phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four years we have had
another term, nancy pelosi of california may be planning to step down. began when pelosi moved to december 5th. where do these z new players fit in the balance of power and why does it matter? contributor jimmy williams is here to break it down for us. my man who was with me through the night for the insomniacs. all right. so elizabeth warren, a big emotional win for the democrats getting back that seat that was teddy kennedy's for so long. what does the new leadership role mean? >> understand how the senate works. when a freshman senator comes in, they don't have a leadership role. they may have a symbolish role. taking the seat back -- being against the banks. which is the new financial protection bureau. >> certainly, absolutely. question question becomes what will the role be in the senate. most freshman senators when they come in, they sit back on the back benches. they sit down, they listen, they come up with an expertise area whether it be immigration and taxes or whatever it is. and they learn as much as they can. and they give speeches when needed. and they keep quiet. that's what
to the idiot republican leader of california. it looked like somebody has slapped him with a cold fish. he invented proposition 187. >> stephanie: yeah and we have come a long way since that. i was just thinking about that yesterday in california. look at any -- it's like gay rights or any -- when it's the right thing to do you know, when it is all about human beings, i'm telling you -- it used to be okay to talk like that, remember? >> caller: pete wilson should % have had a latino mate like arnold. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: yeah, it was a bad day for the haters. latino vote devastated the gop even worse than the exit polls showed. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: obama won by an aye-popping 75-23 margin. the exit poll of 71%. that is huge. >> huge! >> huge! >> stephanie: in colorado latinos went for the president by 87% to 10. >> wee. >> stephanie: and the pole director says this makes known the latino giant is wide awake, cranky and taking names. [ laughter ] [ applause ] >> stephanie: let's go to gail in syracuse. >> caller: hi steph. >> stephanie
state, california. >>> democrats have strengthened their control of the senate taking two seats away from the republicans. the races that changed hand are in the states of indiana and massachusetts. >>> and there is a wild card in maine, independent former governor angus king, elected to follow olympia snow. he has not said which party he will vote with. >> obama re-elected. majority in the house and senate remain. marijuana legalized in two states, colorado and washington. gay marriage is legalized in maryland and maine. >> look at everything you listed, plus you look at the big role, latino population, played, and obama won the group by 70% you. have to wonder. heard the analysts talk about this all night. time for introspection in the republican party, because maybe slowly getting at a pace where the country is getting. a lot to deal with. the coverage of the election of president obama continues. >> we'll get some perspective on the campaign, the strategy and what lies ahead. stay with us. ♪ ♪ >> announcer: "world news now" weather brought to you by united health care. every
. as republicans, we look at the state of california. why do we have to leave 55 electoral votes up for grabs, or actually give up 55 electoral votes and not contest them at all. same thing with new york. that's a ton of electoral votes that wer n're not contesting ri now. what we needed to do as a party is concentrate on the economic and national security issues and move away from the social issues. >> penny, what we haven't done in this election is really square out what kind of america the population wants. in terms of -- at the moment, we're going for big government and small taxation and that doesn't work. how are we going to square it? >> exactly. and that's where the balance needs to be. and i agree with boris this is where the president really is going to have to step forward and really put down the agenda. what it looks like, and really be the person that starts to negotiate in a much more up front or much more out-front area as far as on the fiscal path. you know, the senate that was just elected is probably more diverse. you actually have more conservatives and more liberals now in
in california, having elected barack obama and just the immediate punch in the stomach with prop 8. >> chicago, having left grant park and saw the numbers coming in california, i remember feeling like this whole sort of -- mixed feeling of elation and depression at the same time that my home state could do that. well now four states after 32 consecutive losses over 32. no state had ever voted for marriage equality. four states yesterday. all voted for marriage equality. minnesota voted down same-sex marriage ban and maine and maryland. so it's now -- what is it? 4-36. we're 4-4 in this election. that's amazing. >> stephanie: david, that's what i was saying. for some reason for me it feels sweeter this time around because it feels more inclusive. it feels -- and as i was saying, it is just this solid wall of obstructionism. nastiness, racism, whatever you want to call it that this president has had to deal with. do you know what i'm saying? wasn't that an amazing feeling last night? >> it was. that's really -- th
for a minute in the battleground states. what about california? if part of you can't get 45% of the vote, much above 40% of the vote in california is not a party about the future. >> and blaming chris christie is exactly maybe what's wrong with the party. you tell me. he should step above it. but can he? >> i think there are a lot of republicans that need to fight back. and you look at this party, jon meacham, this party has lost 5 out of the last 6 elections when it comes to the popular vote. and they had a great victory two years ago, but the same thing happened in 1994. look historically, jon. 1992, bill clinton, a new democrat wins. two years later rejected by a republican revolution. two years later, re-elected. the same thing has happened again. by republicans who have won. republicans won an historic landslide. we were here two years ago. a lot of unhappy democrats. two years later, they're seen as overreaching and rejected by the american people. >> democrats have shown a greater capacity of the modern era to learn from adversity. and the '94 example is the great one. president bush, i
to other races in the country where they could target rick hubble -- republicans. california there have been two factors, which was to turn the congressional map on its head. we are almost able to ignore california even though it is the biggest day, and maybe watch one or two seats. now we're watching a dozen seats to see which party takes control. when it comes to the senate, if you look at the northern part of the country, if you look at montana, north dakota, indiana, and wisconsin, all four of those races are in our categories, and republicans need to win all four of them if they have any hope of getting the majority. in each one of those that they lose, the chance the republicans will gain back control decreases for the perry >> will there be anything that surprise you? our job is toj avoid as many surprises as process. in hopes of we will avoid a surprise, but i would be surprised if there is not a surprise, particularly on the house side. the presidential battleground, i think the senate battle ground, states we know come on the house side, but almost expect there to be a surpris
but actually you can't tell the total number of votes in the nation until california gets around to doing it. you know, some states count them very clean and don't seem to have any problem. >> megyn: how about virginia? is that true of virginia. >> virginia, that has been true. when george allen was defeated for senator six years ago by 6,000 or 7,000 votes, virginia went right down, you know, they went back over that, i believe there was recount or reexpectation of the vote, less than 100 votes changed. it was pretty straightforward. new hampshire is famous for doing that well, too and so forth. other states have had bigger problems. >> bret: we should point out if we put that back up. that was the national popular vote total. that will pop up throughout the night as well. you will see the actual vote total through the night. these are all the states throughout the nation and there you see it as it continues to tick up and for us, after the iowa caucuses, the difference was added, 61256 right now so i don't have to pull out the calculator. >> megyn: didn't you get yelled at by math teacher
in southern california. >> what did haley barbour say about jim jeffords in vermont? >> again, during this presidential process when i was asking olympia snowe or asking a candidate about olympia snowe, are you glad she's in your party? he wouldn't answer. >> right. >> and then we asked haley who said, "hell, yeah. i'm glad olympia snowe is in our party and i wish jim jeffords was, too." even on his most liberal day, jim jeffords was going to get elected more than anybody in vermont. >> do you think -- what's the time frame here? is it that the republican party has perhaps a year and a half to sort of figure out what direction they're going to head in? a year and a half before the leaders of the republican party go to the front window of the club that they belong to, open up the drapes and look out on main street and see the reality of life in america today? >> this happens all the time. i mean, i remember getting elected in 1994. you know, "u.s. news & world report" had a cover talking about the end of the democratic party. you remember 1980. >> yeah, yeah. >> people were saying the
of that is sending george w. bush to california in 2000 and spending $10 million in that state when we refused in the gore campaign to spend a dime on the assumption that if they said they're going to get california, they might get it. they lost it. >> shrummy, good to see you. >> bob shrum, thank you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. live election day coverage from washington, d.c. colorado is another one of the key battleground states in this election. the polls there, scheduled to open in less than ten minutes. cnn's ed lavendera is live in lakewood, colorado. >> reporter: good morning, john. western suburb of denver. romney campaign and obama campaigns will be paying close attention to what happens here. how jefferson county votes, many say, will determine which side wins the state of colorado and its nine electoral votes. that's because the nature of this county is equal parts republican, democrat and independent swing voters. they're looking to turn out the vote in jefferson county. early, 1.7 mill
. in higher third of unemployment. what else is dark? california is dark. these are safe democratic states. where is unemployment low? from north dakota down to oklahoma none of that is going for obama. only one place perhaps. virginia is a potential swing state and also wisconsin. maybe that low rate is a precondition for obama to potentially win it. let's look at the change. again, very similar. darker is less change. less improving unemployment. new york, not a good state for change of unemployment over the last year but probably safely in the obama camp. the one place you might want to look here, nevada, florida, north carolina and virginia. those are all potentially in play because they had some improvement in the unemployment rate and if that had not been there, they might have been for romney. i would like to give you a definitive answer. you have the level of unemployment and you have the change. that's what makes this a horse race, simon. >> it's fascinating to see that the way you slice and dice going into the election whether it's turnout or amazing. steve, thank you very much.
votes right now in california. when they meet this will be on the agenda and should be on the agenda. remember two ways to disinfranchise people. we want that. and another way to be disinfranchised someone who shouldn't be voting cancelled your vote out. >> the book who's counting and how they put your vote at risk. thank you, john. >> gretchen: how many of you think you are better off now than four years ago. stunning worry from the exit polls. on works for president obama. and he's up next . ♪ >> tonight, more than 200 yearrs after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the path of perfecting our union moves forward. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robituss
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
california where four men were planning to join al qaeda. the suspects are accused of planning to bomb targets overseas and here at home. if convicted, the defendants could each face 15 years in prison. >>> and "usa today," a study finds people out of work at some point in their career are more likely to have a heart attack after the age of 50. researchers believe individuals laid off or fired are more likely to be at risk than those who left their jobs voluntarily. and mika, you talk about this all the time. the physical impact -- >> and mental. >> that unemployment has because of the middle income. >> on entire families. >> the "los angeles times," humans may not be the only species to experience a midlife crisis. a new study of over 300 chimpanzees and 170 orangutans finds they also suffer -- >> and willie was talking to me about this. >> oh, willie, you're too young. >> he did. >> i've got a guy. >> apparently they suffer from a dip in happiness around their mid lives. midlife point of their life span. the study provides new insight suggesting the midlife crisis is driven by biolog
california, democrats line. caller: hi there, mr. ornstein, guest: hi. caller: i have to two questions. first off, i want to congratulate you for demonstrating integrity, because i believe you're representing a highly conservative institution with american enterprise and your views are coming across unbiased. guest: thank you. caller: secondly, i am not scared of the nuclear option. initially based on my limited experience or knowledge about it, and/or the stopping of the senate. i had an think it might be a portal we might have to pass through as a country to get beyond it. is it unprecedented that somebody, a majority leader would take that option, and what else in terms of the nuclear option could be used for if it became something that was standard fare? do they have to stand on the floor and talk during a filibuster? i seem to recall that i have seen that happen in my lifetime. guest: we have never used the so-called nuclear option. the senate has come close several times. that it ise the idea a continuing body and a unique body. what we see in the debate and the rules have been reversed
was the florida card. the assumption since 2000 was you have to win florida. california, new york are no longer in play. for republicans you have to win texas and florida to move forward. >> a call to make here. the state of massachusetts the senate race much talked about for months on end in massachusetts, the first woman his to win an office of t kind in the state of massachusetts and "fox news" projects it is a done deal. this is a gain for the democrats and a loss for the republicans. elizabeth warren has beaten scott brown knocks news state of for the massachusetts. a democratic strategist, how did this happen. >> there was no outside money and an $80 million race. she became a good candidate r time. she helped tremendously was helped by the convention in charlotte as many democrats were and the debates. scott brown hurt himself badly in the debates. he came off as someone they didn't recognize. angry and defensive. huge win for massachusetts. barnd.elloo i'm jeff barnn. pilbert. fox45 is youu home ll nighh with vote 2012. 2012. we bringing you up to the minutes resslls on the ttree ball
to the california question no. 3, which is on medical marijuana. >> there are so many things to talk about. washington post apologized for prematurely saying elizabeth warren would win. >> let's talk about the tammy baldwin victory. that was hugely significant. all of us remember her role at the center of support for community uprising against scott walker, and when you combine that kind of pushed back of so many of us witness and her courageous position of that in the sense of aligning herself with not just the trade unions, who have showed up with tremendous support on her behalf, but also grass-roots groups, but young gay and lesbian organizations that got under covered in their role but played a big part. she is somebody who has been debated in this race. the propaganda groups tried to pick up on video she recorded on gay pride day and say, what an enforcer of trends gender behavior she is. she stood up and said, i am for defending the rights of the vulnerable to fight back, whether it is defending when men, -- defended women, maintaining a means of negotiating, or whether it is the ri
good morning, blythe danner. hi, blythe danner. >> that's very nice. i'm out in california right now. it is early for me. how are you doing? >> stephanie: i'm good. i know i spoke to you on the red carpet once somewhere and i spoke to your daughter, gwyneth paltrow and i said you'll never know who i interviewed. blythe danner. she went along with the joke. >> i'm very happy. i came to fame as being gwyneth's mom which is fine with me. >> stephanie: and much more. how are things out on the campaign trail. why are you so motivated this time around? >> so excited. out connecting with people. listening to what they had to say about how they are -- their kids have been working so hard. i can't get over the kids -- the field offices and they're so smart and they've just got -- they were such a big help to me. i think first as a woman and then as a mom and a grandmother i just -- i can't imagine how anybody could not vote for our president. when you think about what he has done, how much he's accomplished. i said
of los angeles, not your home state of california, but still, you're there. i want to talk to you about the lines. these lines of early voters we're seeing today, looks like winding around street corners, you have people in southern florida, casting ballots, waiting for hours to do so, some from what i've heard, some are just walking away, giving up. question to you is how confident are you by the time the polls close tomorrow that everyone who wants to vote can? >> well, as you know, the governor, governor scott and the legislature reduced early voting by six days. they even fought in court the opportunity to extend voting hours at a polling place where there had been a bomb threat. our hope is that people will go out and vote. i can tell you there are 125 offices. we have been working two years here in florida. >> what is your confidence level? are you confident that everyone who wants to vote will be voting? >> i'm confident that we'll make every effort to get them out to vote. you talked about the enthusiasm gap. i haven't seen it. i didn't see it in tampa. i haven't seen it in miam
highway between southern california and las vegas. santa ana winds spread the fire to both side of the interstate. 15, in fact, in cajun pass yesterday, backing up traffic in that area for hours. fire crews managed to keep the flame from spreading to nearby homes. >>> and we'll lighten the mood here with what is no doubt one of our "favorite stories of the day." check out my saints. yes, indeed. boys in black and gold. particularly defensive back, patrick robinson. he returns an interception, 99 yards for a touchdown last night against the eagles there in the dome. >> drew brees threw two touchdown passes. the eagles are pretty much toast. i'll let rob do the best part. >> saints win. saints win. they beat philly, 28-13. who dat. not a stellar season for the saints. at this point, every win is at least, is -- a moral victory. >> all three of them. way to go. >> whatever. long way off to the playoffs. don't count them out yet. coming up next, we'll turn our attention to clean-up along the east coast. how some communities are making progression, and now worried it could all be wip
? >> iowa. >> reporter: anybody else? >> california. >> that accent where are you from? >> i'm australian. i tried to vote today. >> he tried. he tried. >> as soon as pennsylvania came in i was very optimistic when pennsylvania came in. >> reporter: anybody in pins and needles thinking we would be here until 3:00 or 4:00 in the morning. >> some of these people went to virginia and working and knocked on doors that sort of thing. >> yes, absolutely. we're from virginia and we thank the volunteers from maryland and d.c. >> okay. >> who came out to help. >> i got to be honest. they had the map. they were coloring it in with marker. i saw a lot of red up there and i was like uh-oh. we got that many idiots? i was concerned. but when we got [ singing ] oh- hi-oh celebration oh, oh! >> you're looking live at bruce johnson and live in chicago where this party has just begun. >> as we await the condition session speechs on the national stage, we have local races to talk about here in washington d.c. incumbent d.c. council member michael brown apparently defeated with 97% of the vote counted. challen
, real quick, i'm going to share my favorite ratherism. this was when i was in california watching on the trinatron, dan rather said that the race that night, he said this is like a too long car ride home from the beach in a too tight bathing suit. >> i remember. >> i love it. >> that would be a long car ride. that's pretty good. >> mike, what are you looking at today? >> a little sandy. we're going to have a big indication early with that 7:00 poll close in virginia. romney's tried to be so dependent on battleground virginia. we're going to know pretty soon what kind of a night, how long a night it's going to be for mitt romney just as we're watching hamilton county in ohio, two counties, those virginia -- in virginia, tell me who wins loudon county, virginia, it was obama in '08, tell me who won those counties, i'll tell you who almost certainly is president. we also know very early from the demographic in your exit polls, that if young people turn out, and since it's not a specific state, that's going to be a huge indicator if i want any one demographic piece from tonight it's t
hispanic vote, about 11% this time out and you see an influx of younger people and people from california who have come here and they have changed the complexion of this state. it's now a very purple state. a third democratic, a third republican and this county where i am a third independent. we're here in arapaho which is south of denver, one of the swingiest of the swing counties. you can see behind me they're counting ballots. they're counting ballots that have already been mailed in. that's the numbers we're working on now. this is a big mail in early vote, early state here in arapaho, county. about 68% people mailed in before voting started today. now this is a state that was concerned about voting problems but it didn't turn out that way. because so many people voted early, the polling places were able to handle people who showed up. one area where they had a 90 minute, two hour wait and they said to people look if you change precincts you can go next door and you can vote in five minutes. that said, now this state is really beginning to count the votes that were cast today. about a
what the impact will be on the national figures in the race for president. california, washington, hawaii have gone for obama, idahoor romney. no big surprises there for people. as you see there with the big vote, the national vote here, mitt romney still showing up here at 2 percentage points ahead of barack obama. right now the eyes of the obama and romney campaigns are watching the fates of their campaigns and the future of the nation, all coming in as each return comes in. abc 7 is your election station tonight. senior political reporter is live at the obama campaign. he's in chicago. let's check in with him. >> we have a long and uncertain night but don't tell that to the cheerers here at obama head quarters in chicago. they are very upbeat as they watch the results come in. particularly when they have seen the numbers come in in pennsylvania, from wisconsin, from new hampshire. they believe that gives them a clear path. they also say senior staff that i talked to early tonight that they read the tea leaves yesterday when they saw mitt romney in ohio. they say that was, quote
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